Course Information
Course title
Econometric Theory (Ⅱ) 
Semester
109-2 
Designated for
COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES  GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF ECONOMICS  
Instructor
CHING-I HUANG 
Curriculum Number
ECON8010 
Curriculum Identity Number
323EM0660 
Class
 
Credits
4.0 
Full/Half
Yr.
Half 
Required/
Elective
Required 
Time
Wednesday 6,7,8(13:20~16:20) Thursday 9,10(16:30~18:20) 
Remarks
Restriction: MA students and beyond OR Restriction: Ph. D students
The upper limit of the number of students: 30. 
 
Course introduction video
 
Table of Core Capabilities and Curriculum Planning
Table of Core Capabilities and Curriculum Planning
Course Syllabus
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Course Description

The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with econometric analysis of cross session and panel data. 

Course Objective
The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with econometric analysis of cross session and panel data. We will also discuss the identification problem. There is no formal prerequisite. However, you are expected to have known the basic asymptotic theories, such as the Law of Large Numbers and the Central Limit Theorem. 
Course Requirement
Grades will be determined by problem sets, a midterm exam, and a final exam. 
Student Workload (expected study time outside of class per week)
 
Office Hours
 
References
待補 
Designated reading
One textbook is Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data by Jeffrey .Wooldridge
(MIT Press 2010). An electric version of the book is accessible from the NTU Library web page. This book and its Student’s Solutions Manual and Supplementary Materials are both reserved in the Social Science Library (辜振甫先生紀念圖書館).

The other textbook is Econometrics by Bruce E. Hansen, which can be downloaded from
his website https://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~bhansen/econometrics/.

In addition, we will use Identification Problems in the Social Sciences by Charles F. Manski (Harvard University Press 1995) to briefly introduce the identification problem.  
Grading
   
Progress
Week
Date
Topic
No data